Tramontane : The Pride of Lebanese Cinema

Tramontane is a simple narrative that  leads to labyrinthine deceit and denial in this Lebanese drama that’s part identity thriller, part historical parable. Rabih (Barakat Jabbour) is a blind musician who applies for a passport (a European tour beckons) only to discover that he’s not who he thinks he is. Everyone involved in the Lebanese Civil War is guilty of  social deception and, worse still, his beloved uncle Hisham (Toufic Barakat) was probably once a village-slaughtering maniac.They’re also non-metaphorical, even if they are designed to represent collective stories of atrocity and loss.

Director Vatche Boulghourjian, Actress Julia Kassar, and music composer Cynthia Zaven were there during the screening and discussion of the movie at the interactive session of the  cine-club. The public was enthusiastic and praised the high caliber movie describing it as a well established story along with an emotionally artistic image and powerful music.

Boulghourjian expressed his satisfaction ,” I met my goal to create a balance between the narrative function and the thematic purpose of the story”.  Boulghourjian and Kassar expressed their mutual appreciation of their collaboration on this project. They also praised the performance of Barakat Jabbour (Rabih) whom presence on set was empowering for the whole team. On the other side, Zaven pointed out that the music is meant to tell the story where words fail. Kassar finally unveiled that she is currently working on upcoming surprising projects.

To sum it up, Rabih’s blindness unfortunately is supposed to carry an extra weight of meaning, conveying the sense of Lebanon made sightless by the war and blinded by continuous lies that prevent national healing.

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